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20121216
20121216
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
are everywhere. we want to you remember this -- just last month, this new york city police officer made news by offering a homeless man in times square a pair of boots on a cold night. or this -- a tennessee boy who helped his brother in a wheelchair compete in a triathlon, helping him achieve his dream to cross a finish line. >>> or the football team at one arizona high school who protected this fresh han with special needs from bullies. and just this weekend, there's a texas cop who wrapped $100 bill in a traffic ticket he gave to one struggling dad. just one of the encouraging moments of humanity we have seen this year. it's important to keep in mind there's still good in the world even when tragic things happen. >>> what could prompt one to carry out such horrific acts, many questions will never be answered. we'll talk with an expert in criminal behavior. erin burnett joins us, next. sen. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male annou
with any fears that the children may have? dr. charles sew city a psychiatrist and medical director for the los angeles county department of children and family services. dr. sophie, thanks very much for coming in. so what's the most important thing parents can say or do to alleviate any concerns for these young kids? >> make sure their emotional responses are intact and their children don't become frightened. you need to have that discussion. talk to the children, ask them what they know. if they don't know anything, give them an education what happened. no gory details and then listen. the key is to listen to your children and then answer age appropriate lit questions. but answers less never sex more information and listen to your children. > how do parents make sure they don't project their own fears onto the kids? >> i think there's several ways this parents can protect themselves and not worry that they are going to put onto their children their own fears and concerns and these by talking to each other as parents, talking to other parents and making sure that they have at least
of as characteristically violent. we think of big cities as places where there's gun violence. and of course there is. but these kinds of shootings don't happen in big cities. they happen usually in small towns or suburbs. >> and is there a common thread in the mental health history of the boys involved in these? >> there is almost always a mental health condition. the sad thing is it's often unrecognized and untreated. so we don't know if that will be true in this case. but in most of the cases we looked at, there was after-the-fact evidence of mental disorders but no treatment. that's disturbing because we like to think we can recognize the symptoms. but particularly when the shooters are younger than this one, the ones we looked at were 13, 12, the signs of distinguished mental illness that are going to be so vivid if they survive into their 20s are not so easy to discern when they're 13. so sadly there is a -- there's evidence after the fact often that comes up in forensic examinations, but not the kind of evidence that leads to the treatment that they so desperately need. >> it's also interestin
to themselves, how could this happen in our little community here, a small city, small town, 20,000 people, not far from dan bury, as i walk around, people don't know what to say. >> yeah. and i mean, this is the kind of -- i mean a parent never gets over the loss of a child, especially to have it around the holidays and each year that remainder around this time, when everyone else is celebrating. i think people in this community will never forget that and each holiday a remembrance of those whose lives were lost. >> i got in front of me here, this is painful if you look at this. this is the list of the victims the state police released -- >> horrific. >> the 30 people -- excuse me 26 people who were killed at the school. six adults and we see their names and their ages, 29, 47, 52, 30, 56, and 27. but then you see the names of the children and all of them, 20 kids, either 6 or 7 years old, charlotte, 6, daniel, 7, olivia, 6, josephine, 7, anna, 6, dylan, 6. i mean you see these names. you go down, jessica, 6, benjamin, 6. >> to see photographs that the parents are releasing. we're only sh
of ours who is a retired new york city police officer. he taught her how to shoot. she was very responsible with the gun. she was a very responsible person in general, especially in terms of safety. >> ellen, she took the boys to the shooting range. that's been talked about. she did take them to the shooting range? >> from what i understand, yep. >> and what did you want to say about that? >> again, i guess i want to j t just -- um -- um -- um -- um mickic russ as far as safety. nancy wouldn't answer her phone or look at a text in the car. if i got in the car, it was oops, seat belt, at the first dippi ding or before the ding happened. she was very careful and cautious and responsible. in regard to leaving anything out as far as a gun, it is -- i can't believe show with do the . >> sebastian, tell us your memories? >> a very dignified woman, a lot of class, very proper, great moral compass. we just saw her three weeks ago, my place, i left, accident say bye. she send embassy text zurngts say bye to me. the kind of person she was. very polite and nice to you, a really good perso
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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